Aggravation of Respiratory Diseases by Silent Reflux

Silent reflux, also known as laryngopharyngeal reflux (LPR), can not only cause a variety of airway symptoms but can also aggravate symptoms of airway conditions, such as asthma and pollen allergies. What is silent reflux? The term reflux refers mainly to the rising of gastric juice out of the stomach. The acid can irritate the […]

Continue reading

LPR Surgery – An Ultimate Option That Often Fails

Surgery can be very efficient for laryngopharyngeal reflux (LPR) but always bears the risk of complications. Operating is, therefore, the last option to consider for the treatment of LPR and is only recommended in extreme cases. Moreover, the success rate of surgery for LPR is much lower than for classical reflux (GERD). Because silent reflux […]

Continue reading

Acid Reflux Diet: A Common Pitfall

Reflux symptoms in the esophagus, such as heartburn, are primarily caused by rising stomach acid.[1] Chronic acid exposure leads to sensitized pain receptors in the esophagus. They become hypersensitive and respond to stimuli that would typically not cause any problems, and as a consequence, people get heartburn.[2] Acidic Foods Can Cause Heartburn. Once the pain […]

Continue reading

LPR Diet

A diet for laryngopharyngeal reflux (LPR) should meet three criteria: The food should be low in acid and fat, and at the same time, improve digestion. Low-acid diet for LPR Acid activates pepsin, which promotes inflammation.[1] While acidic foods do not cause reflux, they massively exaggerate the symptoms. They add fuel to the fire. For […]

Continue reading

The pH Scale in the Context of Reflux

The pH is a measure of acidity. Acids play a crucial role in the development of acid reflux symptoms. What is the pH value? The pH indicates how acidic or basic (alkaline) something is. The pH scale ranges from 0 to 14. The smaller the value, the more acidic, and the higher the value, the […]

Continue reading

What is LPR?

LPR stands for laryngopharyngeal reflux. The term reflux describes the backward or return flow of stomach acid. Reflux is often associated with heartburn, the result of stomach acid irritating the throat. In LPR, stomach acid flows not only back up to the esophagus (food pipe) but also further up to the throat. The problem is […]

Continue reading

How to Fix Reflux for Good

This is the fourth and final part of my interview series with Dr. Mark Noar about the link between gastric motility and acid reflux. In the previous parts we discussed some foundational factors: gastric motility, gastroparesis, and pyloric outlet obstruction. Now we will discuss how all those things paint a complete picture of a patient’s […]

Continue reading

The Hidden Link Between Gastroparesis and Reflux Treatments

Basically, gastroparesis means delayed gastric emptying. Gastroparesis can lead to a host of symptoms. Bloating, nausea, stomach pain, vomiting, and acid reflux, are just a few of them. I interviewed expert gastroenterologist Dr. Mark Noar, to find out about the causes, diagnosis, and treatment of gastroparesis. Interview on Gastroparesis & Reflux In a few sentences, […]

Continue reading

Obstruction of the Pyloric Sphincter Causes Reflux

The pyloric sphincter sits at the bottom end of the stomach. It controls how fast food enters the intestines. It is surprisingly common for the pyloric sphincter to be too tight. Some common medical terms for that are pyloric obstruction, pyloric stenosis, and gastric outlet obstruction. If the pyloric sphincter is obstructed, it can cause […]

Continue reading